bad addictionWhile our marketing agency is quick to talk about addictions when it comes to social media, etc, we do like to weave in healthy tips (that aren’t related directly to marketing) because our health choices do impact our wealth!! Today I’m going to talk about how to swap a bad addiction with a good one.

BAD ADDICTION: It’s a bad idea to turn to sugary foods for a “quick fix” yet most of us do this unconsciously thinking we are hungry. In reality, most likely we’re tired (see the Importance of Sleep post here), thirsty or both! Eating too much sugar makes you crash; not a winning strategy for an entrepreneur with an overflowing inbox. Believe it or not, one of the reasons we crave sugar once we start eating it is because our body is registering the intake as not nourishing the body (fed, but not nourished). But enough of the bad, let’s look at a good replacement.

While productivity and health go hand in hand, here is a simple success formula to follow:
cut sugar, add water!

A Business Journal article titled, “15 Terrible Things That Happen If You Eat Too Much Sugar”, sites newly drafted World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines for sugar consumption. Currently, the average American consumes 22 teaspoons per person per day; that’s four times the amount considered healthy by the new WHO guidelines!

These new guidelines recommend that Americans consume no more than 5% of their daily calories from sugar – down from 10%. To an average, healthy adult, that would mean 25 grams, or about six teaspoons of sugar per day. That means roughly 10 Hershey’s Kisses or a single can of Coke. Realistically, most Americans have an overdeveloped addiction to sugar.

It wasn’t always this way.

Your grandmother intrinsically knew that too much sugar would lead to cavities, weight gain and losing your appetite for healthy food. What she could never know is that sugar abuse also contributes to some of the worst chronic illnesses such as diabetes, obesity, liver failure, pancreatic cancer.  Read the entire article here.

drinking_water_is_healthier_can_candyOkay, enough of the negative, let’s get to the positive point.

GOOD ADDICTION: So, if we were to get rid of our sugar addiction, what would we replace it with? That’s easy: water!

A Web MD article: “6 Reasons to Drink Water” highlights how drinking water (either plain or in the form of other fluids or foods) is essential to your health.

The overwhelming evidence shows that putting down sugar in favor of water can help achieve the following six health benefits:

  • Maintain the balance of body fluids.
  • Control calories.
  • Energize muscles.
  • Keeps skin looking fresh.
  • Help kidney function.
  • Maintain normal bowel function.

American Council on Exercise provided simple guidelines for adequate water consumption.

Below are even more reasons to pick up the H2O:

  • Water composes 75 percent of all muscle tissue and about 10 percent of fatty tissue.
  • Water acts within each cell to transport nutrients and dispel waste.
  • Water composes more than half of the human body.
  • It’s impossible to sustain life for more than a week without it.

An easy guideline to follow is to drink at least half your weight in ounces of water every day (not including tea and other beverages.) If you exercise, you may want to drink at least your total weight in water daily. I drink up to a gallon a day as it helps fuel my body and control my appetite.

Team Web Marketing Therapy loves candy and sweet tasting goodies. Love aside, some of us have given up our addiction to refined sweets (yours truly!) and others have moderated theirs.

If your reliance on sugar is getting out of hand, be proud you recognized it then get your liter bottle of water and chug away. You will feel and look better for it and so will your marketing efforts!

Sources:

Business Insider article: http://www.businessinsider.com/effects-of-eating-too-much-sugar-2014-3

Web MD article: http://www.webmd.com/diet/6-reasons-to-drink-water?page=2

American Council on Exercise H20 intake recommendations http://www.acefitness.org/fitfacts/pdfs/fitfacts/itemid_173.pdf